Were Vikings Muslim?

Islam, Technology, Uncategorized
New research finds ‘Allah’ woven into burial clothes Tom Herbert for Metro.co.ukThursday 12 Oct 2017 4:03 pm Share this article with Facebook Share this article with Twitter Share this article with Google Plus Share this article through email 3.8k The Arabic characters appear on woven bands of silk in burial costumes found in Viking Age boatgraves (Picture: Annika Larsson) Fascinating new research has suggested Vikings could have been Muslim after archaeologists found the word ‘Allah’ woven into their burial clothes. An investigation into funeral clothes which dates back to the ninth and 10th centuries have shed some new light on the relationship between the two worlds. Deadliest bomb in Somalian history kills at least 231 in Mogadishu Experts found that patterns woven into garments excavated in Sweden spell the words ‘Allah’…
Read More

First ever blueprint unveiled to construct a large scale quantum computer

Technology
First ever blueprint unveiled to construct a large scale quantum computerFebruary 1, 2017Prototype of the core of a trapped ion quantum computer. Credit: Ion Quantum Technology Group, University of SussexAn international team, led by a scientist from the University of Sussex, have today unveiled the first practical blueprint for how to build a quantum computer, the most powerful computer on Earth. This huge leap forward towards creating a universal quantum computer is published today (1 February 2017) in the influential journal Science Advances (1). It has long been known that such a computer would revolutionise industry, science and commerce on a similar scale as the invention of ordinary computers. But this new work features the actual industrial blueprint to construct such a large-scale machine, more powerful in solving certain problems than any computer…
Read More

Muslim Student At DC March

Technology
Muslim Student At DC March Is Shepard Fairey's Poster Come To LifeSHARETWEETPIN-IT5 CommentsBookmarkByALLEGRA KIRKLANDPublishedJANUARY 21, 2017, 3:39 PM EDT4815Views WASHINGTON -- Nour Obeidallah bought her American flag hijab long before she decided to attend the Women's March on Washington. Wearing it on Saturday, with a cardboard cutout framing her in the center, she bore a striking resemblance to the "we the people" posters designed for the event by graphic artist Shepherd Fairy."I feel a little overwhelmed," Obeidallah told TPM about her experience at the march. "It's amazing that this many people came out, not just to support women's rights and preserving Planned Parenthood but for so many varied causes." A New York University student considering an economics degree, Obeidallah came to D.C. on an all-expenses trip organized by the university's Asia Pacific Institute."I'd…
Read More

How to Draw with Math

Technology
How to Draw with MathThe regularity of natural patterns can lead artists to use mathematical concepts in works of artBy Hamid Naderi Yeganeh on January 9, 2017  Credit: Hamid Naderi YeganehMathematics can help us to draw real-life objects. The regularity of natural patterns can lead artists to use mathematical concepts in works of art. Many plants have very interesting and beautiful leaves and some mathematical patterns can be found in their structures. For example, Aloe polyphylla is a plant species from Lesotho. The leaves of an Aloe polyphylla form very beautiful spirals.There are various ways of generating leaves shapes with mathematical concepts. A famous example is the Barnsley fern. The British mathematician Michael Barnsley (born 1946) described this beautiful fractal in his book Fractals Everywhere. His fractal resembles the fern leaves. He created this fractal by using the iterated…
Read More

A Muslim teen from New York City who Helped an Orthodox Jewish woman on the subway was honored

Technology
Muslim Teen Honored for Chasing Down Attacker of Orthodox WomanMarcy OsterJanuary 8, 2017(JTA) — A Muslim teen from New York City who helped police catch a man who hit an Orthodox Jewish woman on the subway was honored by community leaders.Ahmed Khalifa, 17, stopped the Brooklyn-bound train on Dec. 28 so that the woman could get medical attention and then jumped off the train to follow the assailant.The slap broke the woman’s glasses and caused her to lose consciousness. She was removed from the train and taken to a local hospital.Khalifa followed the assailant and contacted the Shomrim Jewish safety patrol who got the police involved.He waited near the bus stop until the police arrived. The police removed the assailant, identified as Rayvon Jones, 31, from the bus. Jones was…
Read More

Reading the scroll from En-Gedi

Technology
From damage to discovery via virtual unwrapping: Reading the scroll from En-GediWilliam Brent Seales1,*, Clifford Seth Parker1, Michael Segal2, Emanuel Tov2, Pnina Shor3 and Yosef Porath3+ Author Affiliations↵*Corresponding author. Email: seales@uky.edu  Science Advances  21 Sep 2016:Vol. 2, no. 9, e1601247DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601247ArticleFigures & DataInfo & MetricseLetters PDFAbstractComputer imaging techniques are commonly used to preserve and share readable manuscripts, but capturing writing locked away in ancient, deteriorated documents poses an entirely different challenge. This software pipeline—referred to as “virtual unwrapping”—allows textual artifacts to be read completely and noninvasively. The systematic digital analysis of the extremely fragile En-Gedi scroll (the oldest Pentateuchal scroll in Hebrew outside of the Dead Sea Scrolls) reveals the writing hidden on its untouchable, disintegrating sheets. Our approach for recovering substantial ink-based text from a damaged object results in readable columns at such high quality that serious critical textual…
Read More

Carbon Capture Breakthrough by an Indian company

Technology
Indian firm makes carbon capture breakthroughCarbonclean is turning planet-heating emissions into profit by converting CO2 into baking soda – and could lock up 60,000 tonnes of CO2 a year  Tuticorin thermal power station near the port of Thoothukudi on the Bay of Bengal, southern India. The plant is said to be the first industrial-scale example of carbon capture and utilisation (CCU). Photograph: Roger HarrabinRoger HarrabinWednesday 4 January 2017 10.19 GMTFirst published on Tuesday 3 January 2017 06.01 GMTView more sharing optionsShares9,968Comments333A breakthrough in the race to make useful products out of planet-heating CO2 emissions has been made in southern India.A plant at the industrial port of Tuticorin is capturing CO2 from its own coal-powered boiler and using it to make baking soda.Crucially, the technology is running without subsidy, which is a major advance for carbon capture…
Read More

Israeli rabbis have approved the practice of polygamy

Technology
Israeli rabbis have approved the practice of polygamy to counter what they believe is a demographic threat posed by Arab populations living in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories.An expose by Channel 10, an Israeli broadcasting channel, revealed the practice was approved by the rabbinate that has actively encouraged and facilitated polygamy, claiming the practice will give Jews an edge in the demographic race against Arabs in Israel.One rabbi who has been married for 26 years is filmed by an undercover reporter persuading a single woman to become his second wife.“If your parents ask you why you don’t marry like everyone else,” he told her, “tell them that it is a mitzvah [religious commandment] and I want to do a mitzvah.”The rabbi showed the reporter a letter signed by Jerusalem’s Chief…
Read More

How the Graffiti Boys ignited the Syrian Revolution

Technology
How the Graffiti Boys ignited the Syrian Revolution January 25, 2014 at 12:51 am | Published in: Article, Middle EastYvonne RidleyJanuary 25, 2014 at 12:51 am803SHARES “Ashaab yureed isqat annidham.” This phrase is ringing in the ears of tyrants and despots around the Arab world and means quite simply that the people want to bring down the regime. It is the enduring chant of the Arab Spring, so it’s hardly surprising that these are probably the first words children learn in their cradles as they are rocked to sleep to the beat of this rousing street anthem.When a group of 11-year-old Syrian boys made their way home from school one day and started larking around, as boys of that age do, it was almost inevitable that among the graffiti they scratched on a partially-collapsed…
Read More

DN Jha’s ‘The Myth of the Holy Cow’ examined facts, and its detractors didn’t like that.

Technology
It’s easy to see why the Right wanted this book about Indians’ beef-eating history to be bannedDN Jha’s ‘The Myth of the Holy Cow’ examined facts, and its detractors didn’t like that.Yesterday · 08:30 am  Updated Yesterday · 08:35 amSatyavrat KKShareTweetEmailRedditPrintRight next to my school in Chennai, there used to be a hole-in-the-wall eatery that served as a rite of passage for most of us who’d hit high school. It resembled more a shotgun shack rather than a respectable dining establishment, the kitchen walls seemed covered in soot, so that you could hardly see what was going on in there. The only sensory stimuli was aural, provided by a furious wok and a spatula. The menu was limited, and everybody more or less ordered the same thing, a plate of…
Read More