Battery technology set to break barriers

Technology
Battery technology set to break barriers10 AUGUST 2016 • 7:28PM Once renewable energy can be stored for use on demand, Britain could become self-sufficient in its energy usage CREDIT: CHARLOTTE GRAHAM/REX SHUTTERSTOCK The world's next energy revolution is probably no more than five or ten years away. Cutting-edge research into cheap and clean forms of electricity storage is moving so fast that we may never again need to build 20th Century power plants in this country, let alone a nuclear white elephant such as Hinkley Point.The US Energy Department is funding 75 projects developing electricity storage, mobilizing teams of scientists at Harvard, MIT, Stanford, and the elite Lawrence Livermore and Oak Ridge labs in a bid for what it calls the 'Holy Grail' of energy policy.You can track what they are doing at the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy…
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Autodesk Just Gave Every Fab Lab Access to $25,000 in Design Software

Technology
Autodesk Just Gave Every Fab Lab Access to $25,000 in Design Software 1k1900 Last year Autodesk granted Fab Labs, a global network of workshops and makerspaces connected through the Fab Foundation, access to Tinkercad, 123D Circuits, and Fusion 360 Labs, but that was just the beginning. Earlier this year, Autodesk expanded their generosity to the Fab Foundation’s Fab Academy (which is the foundation’s training initiative) by offering them access to their entire Product Design Collection, and today Autodesk announced that they will be offering all registered Fab Labs in the Fab Foundation’s network 10 licenses to the Product Design Collection.The Autodesk suite of software is a reliable favorite of professionals and hobbyists alike, and having access to these tools is invaluable to a student or part-time inventor who might not otherwise be able to get…
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Muslim doctor: My patient refused to let me treat her because of my religion

Technology
  Acts of FaithOpinionMuslim doctor: My patient refused to let me treat her because of my religion    By Jalal Baig August 10A doctor listening to his patient’s heartbeat with a stethoscope (iStock)Making my rounds in the hospital one day, I put my stethoscope to a patient’s chest while she kept her eyes fixed on the television screen over my shoulder.Hours before, bombs had torn through an airport and a train station in Brussels. My 65-year-old patient watched a flurry of images on Fox News showing unfathomable carnage, and I went through the all-too-familiar ritual of hoping that the perpetrators would not be identified as Muslim, that members of my faith would not be considered guilty by inexplicable association.The sounds of my patient’s voice rose, eclipsing the thump of her heartbeat that I was painstakingly…
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