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China’s Tianwen-1 Probe Sends Back Mars Visuals
China’s Tianwen-1 probe sends back Mars landing visuals
Date:2021-05-19

  BEIJING – Two photos and two videos captured by China’s Mars probe Tianwen-1 during and after the country’s first landing on the red planet were released on Wednesday.

  The lander carrying a rover of the Tianwen-1 mission touched down in the southern part of Utopia Planitia, a vast plain on the northern hemisphere of Mars, on May 15, becoming the country’s first probe to land on a planet other than Earth.

  The first photograph, a black and white image, was taken by an obstacle avoidance camera installed in front of the Mars rover. The image shows that a ramp on the lander has been extended to the surface of Mars. The terrain of the rover’s forward direction is clearly visible in the image, and the horizon of Mars appears curved due to the wide-angle lens.

  The second image, a color photo, was taken by the navigation camera fitted to the rear of the rover. The rover’s solar panels and antenna are seen unfolded, and the red soil and rocks on the Martian surface are clearly visible in the image.

  The probe also sent back a video taken by a camera on the orbiter, showing how the lander and the rover separated from the orbiter during landing.

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Behold! China unveils 1st Mars photos from Zhurong rover

 
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China has released the first photographs taken by its Zhurong rover, which touched down on Mars late on Friday (May 14) as part of the country’s Tianwen-1 mission.

 

The China National Space Administration (CNSA), which runs the mission, has released two Mars photographs taken by the rover: one in color and one in black and white. Both images show parts of the rover and its lander against a backdrop of Utopia Planitia, the expansive northern plain that Zhurong will explore during its mission.

Related: China’s Tianwen-1 Mars mission in photos

 

 

 

This photo is the first color view of Mars from China’s Zhurong rover, looking toward its rear, from its landing spot on a plain in Utopia Planitia following a May 14, 2021 landing. This image was released May 19. (Image credit: China National Space Administration)

The color image shows a view looking to the rear of Zhurong from a navigation camera above the rover’s main deck. Solar arrays are visible, as are some surface rocks and features. The black and white image is from an obstacle avoidance camera at the front of the rover. It was captured with a wide-angle lens that also revealed a view of the Mars horizon in the distance, as well as two subsurface radar instruments on the rover itself.

In addition to the photos from the surface, CNSA also released two short videos of the orbiter and Zhurong rover’s landing capsule separating during Friday’s maneuver. Both videos come from cameras on the orbiter and show the capsule pulling away.

 
 

 

 

This black and white view of Mars is a photo from a navigation camera on China’s Mars rover Zhurong released on May 19, 2021 about 4 days after landing. The ramp to the Martian surface from Zhurong’s lander is visible, as are two subsurface radar instruments on the rover and the Martian horizon in the wide-angle view.  (Image credit: China National Space Administration)

China’s successful Mars landing made the country only the second nation to successfully soft-land on Mars, joining the United States. The Soviet Union and the European Space Agency have also sent missions to the Red Planet’s surface, but those landings have not been successful. Zhurong’s arrival brings the active Mars rover tally to three, joining NASA’s Curiosity and Perseverance rovers.

The landing comes as part of China’s Tianwen-1 mission, which was also the nation’s first successful Mars orbiter; China was the sixth entity to notch that accomplishment in February. Tianwen-1 translates to “Heavenly Questions”; the name Zhurong honors an ancient Chinese fire god. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
See China’s ‘Zhurong’ rover land on Mars in animation
 
 
 
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The six-wheeled, 530-lb. (240 kilogram) Zhurong rover carries six instruments that the rover will use to study geology and climate in the Utopia Planitia region. The rover is meant to operate for about three months. 

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This brief time-lapse captures the moment of separation as China's Zhurong rover and lander cast off from the Tianwen 1 orbiter to descend to Mars.

This brief time-lapse captures the moment of separation as China’s Zhurong rover and lander cast off from the Tianwen 1 orbiter to descend to Mars. (Image credit: China National Space Administration)

Another view of China's Zhurong rover descent capsule separating from the Tianwen 1 orbiter for a landing on the Red Planet in May 2021.

Another view of China’s Zhurong rover descent capsule separating from the Tianwen 1 orbiter for a landing on the Red Planet in May 2021. (Image credit: China National Space Administration)

This brief time-lapse captures the moment of separation as China's Zhurong rover and lander cast off from the Tianwen 1 orbiter to descend to Mars.

This brief time-lapse captures the moment of separation as China’s Zhurong rover and lander cast off from the Tianwen 1 orbiter to descend to Mars. (Image credit: China National Space Administration)

Another view of China's Zhurong rover descent capsule separating from the Tianwen 1 orbiter for a landing on the Red Planet in May 2021.

Another view of China’s Zhurong rover descent capsule separating from the Tianwen 1 orbiter for a landing on the Red Planet in May 2021. (Image credit: China National Space Administration)

Zhurong’s next milestone is expected to occur on Friday or Saturday (May 21 or May 22), when the rover will make its way down the pair of ramps seen in the new greyscale image to reach the Martian surface proper.

Email Meghan Bartels at mbartels@space.com or follow her on Twitter @meghanbartels. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook. 

 

E-mail:webmaster@cnsa.gov.cn

 

Taiwan’s TSMC claims breakthrough on 1nm chips

Research project with MIT and NTU will help improve efficiency of future semiconductors

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TSMC, NTU, and MIT collaborated on 1nm chip science (Getty Images)

TSMC, NTU, and MIT collaborated on 1nm chip science (Getty Images)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), National Taiwan University (NTU), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have made a significant breakthrough in the development of 1-nanometer chips, reports said Tuesday (May 18).

The joint announcement has trumped IBM’s statement earlier in the month about the development of a 2nm semiconductor, British website Verdict reported. While at present the most advanced chips are 5nm, TSMC’s find was likely to lead to power-saving and higher speeds for future electric vehicles, artificial intelligence, and other new technologies.

The discovery was first made by the MIT team, with elements optimized by TSMC and improved by NTU’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Optometrics, according to a report in Nature Magazine.

The key element of the research outcome was that using the semi-metal bismuth as the contract electrode of a two-dimensional material to replace silicon can cut resistance and increase the current, Verdict reported. Energy efficiency would thus increase to the highest possible level for semiconductors.

Over the past decades, chipmakers have tried to cram more transistors onto ever smaller surfaces but have now reached the limit of what can be achieved with silicon, the main material for semiconductors. As a result, scientists have been looking at 2D materials to replace silicon in order to push chips to 1nm and lower.